SABBATH

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sermon: Unleavened Bread and the Holy Spirit


John W. Ritenbaugh
Given 09-Jun-19; Sermon #1492-PM; 74 minutes

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The symbolism of Egypt and the eating of unleavened bread are sometimes misunderstood. Egypt is not directly a metaphor of sin, but instead the venue where the sin is committed. Our forebears did not shed sin as they left Egypt any more than present day Called-out ones shed their sins as they "come out of the world." Eating Unleavened Bread is not a direct metaphor of putting away sin as it is of voluntarily putting on righteousness, yielding to God's shaping power, providing the lion's share of the overcoming and the sanctification process. The Days of Unleavened Bread symbolize what God did for us, not what we did by our own puny power. The Creation, God's public revelation, gives us a modest measure of God's presence, but only His personal calling gives us understanding of the desire for eternal life in our hearts. God begins the process of justification, sanctification, and glorification into literal offspring of God, but we are required to reciprocate. God has meticulously planned this transformation before the foundation of the world, with the historical events already planned in advance. As our forebears experienced a series of ups and downs, recurring crises of faith, so do God's Called-out ones through the duration of the conversion process experience continuous waves ups and downs. The Passover represents the point in our conversion when we quit being observers and become participants, co-workers in the sanctification process. As our forebears, though slaves, lived in relatively comfortable surroundings in Goshen, God's called-out ones today have a large measure of comfort in the world's richest nations. If our sense of comfort were to be disturbed by a divine order to flee, would we automatically yield to the Mandate? Eating unleavened bread symbolizes putting on the righteousness of God's Holy Spirit, not putting out sin with our own puny strengt




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