SABBATH

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Library Topic: Easter


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Many Are Called, But Few Are Chosen (Part Two)

Despite the Council of Laodicea's condemnation of the Sabbath, a group of believers termed Paulicians kept God's laws and resisted the heresy from Rome.

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Consequences of Resurrection and Ascension

Neither Christmas or Easter appear in the Feasts of the Lord, but we find plenty of emphasis on the resurrection and ascension of Christ in the Holy Days.

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Satan's Pagan Holy Days

New Years, Christmas, Easter, Halloween and birthdays all originate in paganism. Satan entices many into accepting these pagan practices through emotional appeals.

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Easter 2017

The world's churches have adopted the fertility symbols of Easter bunnies, Easter eggs, and the traditional Easter ham from pagan, pre-Christian rituals.

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Did Christ's Resurrection Change the Day of Worship? (Part Two)

The timing of Jesus Christ's resurrection has nothing to do with establishing which day God made holy, and everything to do with whether He is the Messiah.

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Sackcloth: A Spiritual Tool

Putting on a spiritual garment of sackcloth in mourning is necessary in humbling ourselves as a part of the process in examining and scrutinizing our lives.

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Why Passover and Not Easter?

The Catholic Church did not forbid keeping the Passover until AD 325. The controversy over Passover or Easter boils down to following Scripture or Roman tradition.

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Are God's Holy Days To Be Kept Today?

Martin Collins insists that if we do not keep God's holy days, we will deprive ourselves of the knowledge of God's plan or purpose. Ancient Israel was termed the Church in the Wilderness, a type of the church of God. Leviticus 23 enumerates the feasts of the Lord, beginning with the weekly Sabbath, the covenant sign between God and His people. Keeping any other day than the Sabbath is an affront to God. God gives details as to how to keep each of these convocations. The seven annual holy days are not considered Jewish or Old Testament, but God's holy days, including the Passover, Pentecost, Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Feast of Tabernacles. Anti-Semitism has been, and continues to be, the catalyst for hatred of these annual holy days of God. Emperor Constantine condemned Judaizers as anathema to Roman Catholicism. The real founder of Christianity, Jesus Christ, kept the all annual convocations, never abolishing them or their significance, anticipating their continuance in God's Kingdom. John's gospel indicates that Christ continued to keep the Feast of Tabernacles and the Last Great Day, as well as the Passover, faithfully keeping the festivals outlined in Leviticus 23 and Exodus 12, providing an example for us. Jesus commanded His disciples also to keep these festivals and to teach others to do so as well. The apostle Paul also faithfully taught and admonished the Gentiles to keep these days. The seven annual feasts are still in force today, and will be kept in the Millennium, when everyone will be following in Christ's footsteps.

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More on Tolerance

Many are guided by a multicultural value system that posits that all values, regardless of their source, are equal and should be tolerated. But God has one way.

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Deuteronomy and Idolatry

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the scripture commanding the saving of second tithe, focuses on the admonition that we learn to fear God, having awe, respect, with a certain measure of dread. We are admonished to internalize the book of Deuteronomy in preparation for our future leadership roles. In one sense, Deuteronomy serves as the Reader's Digest Condensed Book or the Cliff Notes, outlining the details for our salvation, providing us instructions for our relationship to God and our guidebook to the Promised Land. Deviating from this set of instructions leads to apostasy, idolatry or spiritual adultery, a situation in which physical Israel perennially found itself, having become repeatedly immersed in degenerate heathen religious practices. Ezekiel 16 is directed to modern Israel, a people who have outstripped their ancestors in their zeal to defile themselves in a moral and spiritual cesspool. Unfortunately, all of us have been tainted by this degenerate culture. Modern Israel's major sin is idolatry. Once the First Commandment is broken, the others topple like a house of cards. Most of the world worships pictures or sculptures of gods and lords. Those who trust these false entities are as good as dead. There is no alternative to worshipping the one true God. Israel's propensity for idolatry is deeply ingrained in them, impatiently and emotionally clamoring for something they could see—a malleable idol. Unfortunately, this propensity toward idolatry is part of human nature, a natural extension of self-centered coveting; transforming ourselves into the god we serve. God will not brook competition under any circumstances, demanding total destruction of all alternative forms and methods of worship—no form of syncretism with anything pagan whatsoever.

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Chronic Difficulties

Richard Ritenbaugh observes that over two billion people faithfully observe an annual "holy week," consisting of Palm Sunday, Good Friday (the supposed time of the crucifixion), and Easter Sunday. Human tradition and Bible truth do not square. The overwhelming historical chronological evidence clashes with the traditions of billions of people. The sovereign God has been in control of history from the beginning of mankind. God makes things happen when He wants them to happen and in the way they happen. Whether the event happened in 30 AD or 31 AD, the crucifixion occurred on a Wednesday rather than a Friday. Extensive scholarship into the lunar eclipses occurring near the death of Herod, the ascendancy of his son Archaleus, and the reign of Tiberias Caesar corroborates this conclusion. Scripture gives us internal evidence with the accusation that Jesus could tear down a temple constructed by Herod 46 years earlier. Other internal evidence comes from the careful marking of the Holy Days occurring during Christ's three and one half year ministry (prophesied by Daniel's seventy weeks prophecy) in both the synoptic gospels and John's Gospel. The crucifixion took place in the middle of a literal week, with Christ remaining in the grave a full three days and three nights, and resurrected at the end of a Sabbath at sunset. Nowhere in any of the gospels does it say Christ rose on Sunday morning, but that He had already risen. The triumphal entry (labeled by the world as Palm Sunday) actually occurred on Thursday, Nisan 8. Jesus was selected as Passover Lamb on Nisan 10 (John 12:28).

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Bucking Tradition

No one wants to have his traditions or treasured fantasies burst. But when a real Christian is presented with truth, he embraces it out of reverence for God.

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Presumption and Divine Justice

Over the past few generations, orthodoxy in virtually every aspect of life has been discarded, indicating how perverse human nature is in its determination to rebel against God. John Ritenbaugh uses several examples from real life to illustrate human presumption, a tendency which we all share—and one God takes a serious stance against.

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What Makes This a 'Good' Friday?

Good Friday is a semi-holy day for many, commemorating the assumed day Jesus died. Yet its observance is based on bad math and overlooking obvious scriptures.

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Easter: Origins and Implications

The only biblical reference to 'Easter' (in some versions) is a mistranslation of 'Passover.' Easter comes from the Assyrian fertility goddess Ishtar.

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Was Jesus Resurrected on Easter Sunday?

When did Jesus rise from the rich man's tomb? The world—because of tradition—says Sunday, but the Bible reveals the only possible timing of His resurrection.

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Pagan Holidays

The holidays of this world counterfeit God's holy days, but it is obvious that they are very different. God warns us not to be involved in them.

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Holy Days: Passover

Though not a holy day, per se, Passover may be the most important festival ordained by God. Not only does it memorialize Christ's death, it also symbolizes our redemption and forgiveness, allowing us to have eternal life!

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Does Paul Condemn Observing God's Holy Days?

Galatians 4:9-10 is a favorite crutch of those who claim Christians no longer need to observe God's holy days. However, Paul's meaning is quite different.

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'After Three Days'

A scriptural explanation of the time of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, showing that He died on a Wednesday and rose from the dead on the Sabbath.

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Christ's Death, Resurrection, and Ascension

Jesus perfectly fulfilled the Old Testament types, slain as the Passover Lamb, resurrected with the cutting of the wavesheaf, and ascended to His Father at the time of the waving of the sheaf.

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Passover (Part 7)

John Ritenbaugh suggests that people who opt for a fifteenth Passover do not do so from a pure motive for seeking the truth, but instead reflects an irresponsible grab for power. Unfortunately, major reinterpretations and alterations have significantly distorted the meaning of Passover and Unleavened Bread, blurring the distinction between the two events. Even major Protestant theologians realize the drastic changes which placed humanly devised practices on the same status as the commands of God. Beside rendering themselves blind to the true significance of Christ's sacrifice, proponents of the fifteenth Passover (old and new) unwittingly follow Jeroboam's precedent of leading his people into rank paganism.

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The Plain Truth About Easter

Easter is not a Christian name, but belongs to the idolatrous 'queen of heaven.' Here are the origins of Easter eggs and sunrise services, which pre-date Christ.

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The Resurrection Was Not on Sunday

Jesus said He would be 3 days and 3 nights in the tomb, but that is impossible in a Friday crucifixion, Sunday resurrection scenario. Here's the biblical truth.